Makers Days – Weekends in Spring

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We are having a such a fun time hosting our vendors in an ongoing week-end moveable trunk show feast!  Take a moment to learn about these upcoming makers; their life stories add to the allure of their work!  ____________________________________________________________

Eryn Rosenbaum, Jewelry:

Eryn started making earrings about 14 years ago, because that’s when she first pierced her ears. She immediately realized that she had quite a lot of earring buying to catch up with, and simultaneously discovered a bead shop right down the street. The challenge was accepted. Over the following years, she has never turned down the impulse to research and appropriate a new jewelry-making technique, which worked out all right since her husband never, ever minds the new workbenches and equipment that periodically appear in their bedroom. Or as he sometimes calls it, the earring room. While earrings are definitely the focus, Eryn does also make other jewelry such as pendants and rings, and truly enjoys working on custom orders for one-of-a-kind treasures.
The thing Eryn loves most about creating is how each piece turns out differently from the last, yet across all the different techniques and styles she uses, she can always recognize something of herself in each piece. The thing Eryn hates the most about creating is always knowing what time of day it is. If the world had no clocks (and her two children were a little older), Eryn would probably lapse into a pattern of 26-hour days, because 24 just isn’t enough. Eryn’s favorite color is turquoise, which is not a very precise answer since turquoise comes in so many shades and hues. She doesn’t have an unfavorite color.
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Jane Corley, Maker Extraordinaire
I am an almost-empty nester attorney, and have been doing work with collage, photography, and jewelry most of my life. My favorite thing to do these days is to incorporate vintage/antique imagery with whimsical dialogue, which takes form in art/greeting cards. My online identity is http://www.irreverently-yours.com, which is a work in progress but pretty much sums up the sentiment I try to convey. I like using the wide variety of media available today: laser-copy image transfers, acrylic paint, lace, foil, paper, and a Pfaff 2140 sewing machine. Source material for the dialogue balloons is (mostly) from old, dead persons, with a smattering of that from modern comics when they just cannot be denied. I hope these portrayals of the human comedy will tickle your funny bone while letting you express your affection for the recipient.

 

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Vendor Spotlight: Jane Corley

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I think it’s high time we shine the spotlight on those for whom the store would simply not exist; the vendors!  Every so often we’ll be featuring a new vendor, old vendor, or maybe even some wonderful customers and employees!  Check out Jane’s wonderful bio piece, below:  Then come see the neat stuff she makes!_________________________________________________________________

Jane Corley has been a gas station attendant, waitress, newspaper reporter, college professor, author, wife/mom, and attorney, little of which prepared her for a life in the arts, which is precisely why she enjoys such escapades.  Her visual arts training started in high school and college when she was engrossed in large-format photography, prior to completion of her bachelor’s degree in journalism.  She has continued to tack back to creative pursuits in an effort to keep sane while making a living in this big, expensive world.
Jane corley pic
Jane focuses on the sublime and whimsical in collage work using ephemera, found objects, dominoes, postage stamps, comic book images and dialogue balloons, along with the occasional Catholic saint image or medal.  Her work is often irreverent and even goofy, as she tries to create work to inspire others to color outside the lines.
four pics jane
These collages were created using what I call “found and family ephemera.”  Throughout the course of living more than a half century, having parents who almost doubled that, and sharing with them a strong tendency toward pack-rat-ism, I have kept or inherited numerous documents that by themselves don’t have much import.  Examples include a souvenir pamphlet from my mom’s pre-marriage voyage to Europe aboard the Queen Mary, the letter from the station master in Chicago giving her the itinerary of her train trip to New York that 1949 season, stamps from my dad’s collection the appraiser says aren’t worth anything but which I find lovely, extra parts from computer rebuilds my husband was going to pitch, copies of letters from grandparents and great aunts from long ago before long-distance phone calls when folks wrote to chew the fat, and the occasional leaf or feather found along the way.  A friend asked how I can part with such things; my response is that by putting these items together in collage form I give them wings to remind others of times gone by, when keeping a box full of papers and things like these was just an everyday thing.

Makers Connect's photo.Makers Connect's photo.